Bohemia Village Voice  Bohemia Village Voice

For bohemians everywhere

Horntye’s apartments plan unveiled

Horntye Park - mound of soil where apartments may be built

Horntye Park - mound of soil where apartments may be built

Horntye Park Sports Complex held a public consultation in their Lord Cornwallis suite on 28th-29th of September, presenting detailed plans of the proposed new housing developments. It is understood that there will be two linked blocks of apartments of six storeys, plus a further block of social housing for firemen. Horntye trustees and management team, together with representatives of London and South-East Equity Development, were on hand to talk to the public and answer questions. However, they were keen to stress that the plans are not yet finalised.

Brian Clifford, communications consultant for London and South-East Equity, said, “All decisions are yet to be taken.” He told the Voice that feedback from local people will be discussed at a series of meetings on the 19th, 22nd and 23rd of October.  Over a hundred and fifty people came to see the plans during the two days.
Horntye say the residential development is necessary to safeguard the future of the Horntye, which currently costs £1,000 a day to run.
“We provide a service to the community, but it is not sustainable as we are at the moment,” said Kevin Miller, general manager. “Summerfields keeps going with a council subsidy, but Horntye gets no funding, so the whole point is to make ourselves viable for the future.”  If the scheme goes ahead, the money from building the apartments and from the service charges will not only contribute towards running costs, but will also enable the venue to expand its facilities for sporting events, conferences and weddings. As a registered charity all the capital raised from the development must be used, “to provide sport and recreation facilities and opportunities for the people of Hastings”, and not for other purposes.

Vice chairman Jeremy Bunday said that the Cricket Ground is county standard, but county matches are quite expensive to stage, and they are hoping to get county cricket again after a break of four or five years.

The scheme includes extending the Sports Complex itself, bringing the Indoor Bowling Centre across from Falaise, and having offices above the proposed extension such as the Registrer Office, which has to find new premises in the not too distant future. Incorporated in the plans is a block providing social housing for firemen by the side of the fire station. The trustees and management considered several parcels of Horntye’s land as a site for the apartment blocks, and the final choice was the landfill site made when the cricket pitch was dug out. This was considered to be the least environmentally damaging option. London & South East Equity Development have given much thought to the environmental aspects of the proposals. Peter Night-ingale, Development Dir-ector, said he thinks they can get the housing to be the highest-rated eco-houses in the south-east. They will feature grass roofs, sown with a variety of native local grasses, which will insulate the buildings and provide an area for local butterflies and other insects. The grass will absorb the rain so it does not run off the roofs all at once, and this water, together with the grey water from the housing, will be used to water the cricket pitch, saving a great deal of expense.

Later, he said, “We are very encouraged by the support for the Horntye development proposals that we displayed for public consultation. We are analysing the ideas ands views that were put to us. First indications are that local residents positively support the proposals to maintain sports and recreational facilities for the people of Hastings, by building apartments and increasing other facilities within the sports complex grounds. Horntye is a registered charity and creating new income is vital for its survival and long term development.” Not everyone is in favour though. Some local residents are concerned about the height of the apartment blocks, especially as viewed from Bohemia Road. A resident of Bayeux Court said he was “absolutely aghast at the proposals, which are directly opposite and overlooking us.” He objected to the size, height, and number of apartments, and the new pathway planned from Bohemia Road opposite Lidl’s. “It means lots of activity, more litter and more noise.”

Cllr Richard Stevens expressed concern over the vulnerability of pedestrians using the pathway, and also that there is no designated play area included in the plans. He told the Voice, “A development of this size is going to have a significant impact on the area and on local services. It needs improvement in the details.”

“As regards the fire station housing, there has been a lot of discussion as to whether a fire station is needed here as well as on the Ridge. This housing seems to indicate that the Bohemia fire station is secure.” Kevin Miller said, “We hope to apply for planning permission before Christmas.”  

What do you think of the Horntye plans? Contact the Voice at 79, Bohemia Road or Kevin Miller at Horntye Park Sports Complex, Bohemia Road, TN34 1EX. Tel: 716666. kevinmiller@horntyepark.org

  • Two new 6-storey blocks proposed?
  • Blocks to have grass roofs for butterflies?
  • Bowling Centre to move from Falaise to Horntye?
  • Register Office to move to Horntye?
  • Waste water from flats to water cricket pitch?
  • Block for keyworkers?
  • Apartments to be eco-friendly?

Horntye Park - yellow line shows approximate area of Horntye's development

Horntye Park - yellow line shows approximate area of Horntye's development


Horntye Park - Kevin Miller contemplates the proposed skyline (outlined on the background)

Horntye Park - Kevin Miller contemplates the proposed skyline (outlined on the background)


Horntye Park - plans on view in late September

Horntye Park - plans on view in late September

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